oldfilmsflicker
oldfilmsflicker:

oldfilmsflicker:

Okay guys, I spent my entire Friday night combing through Netflix and compiling this handy dandy list (with links!) to 100 films directed by women that you can watch RIGHT NOW. Quite a few of these I haven’t even seen myself! There’s comedies and dramas and romances and horror and action and documentary and foreign and Oscar winners and Razzie winners (maybe?) and pretty much anything you could want to watch. I’m sure there are more films by women on the service (100 out of thousands is a good way of hitting the 12% of films stat right on home though). Anyways, enjoy!
14 Women
2 Days in Paris
2 Days in New York
28 Days
A League of Their Own
Adore
Aeon Flux
After the Wedding
Ai Wei Wei: Never Sorry
American Psycho
And While We Were Here
Bastards
Bedrooms and Hallways
Blackfish
Blindsight
Boys Don’t Cry
The Boys Next Door
The Brady Bunch Movie
Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason
Camilla
Carolina
Cherry Blossoms
Children of a Lesser God
Clueless
Committed
Control Room
Countdown to Zero
The Countess
Der Wald Vor Lauter Baumen (Forest For the Trees)
Desert Hearts
Die Friseuse (The Hairdresser)
Dragstrip Girl
Elegy
Fish Tank
For Ellen
Friends With Kids
Goodbye First Love
The Guilt Trip
Holy Smoke
Home
The Hot Flashes
In Between Days
In the Land of Blood and Honey
The Iron Lady
The Kids Are All Right
La Teta Asustada (The Milk of Sorrow)
Last Call at the Oasis
Life Happens
A Little Bit of Heaven
Look Who’s Talking
Look Who’s Talking Too
Lore
Lost in Translation
Love Serenade
Madeinusa
The Man Who Cried
Me and You and Everyone You Know
Movern Callar
The Moth Diaries
My Brilliant Career
Nowhere Boy
Nuyorican Dream
Old Joy
The Peacemaker
Peeples
The Piano
Ping Pong Playa
Plush
Priest
The Prince of Tides
Protagonist
Puccini For Beginners
The Punk Singer
The Queen of Versailles
Ravenous
Riding in Cars with Boys
The Selfish Giant
Shades of Fear
SherryBaby
Sister
Sleeping Beauty
Something’s Gotta Give
Somewhere
The Square
Strange Days
The Taste of Others
Things Behind the Sun
Tiny Furniture
Tomboy
Touchy Feely
Trois Mondes (Three Worlds)
Una Noche
Union Square
Variety
Vinter’s Luck (A Heavenly Vintage)
The Virgin Suicides
Walking and Talking
Waste Land
Water Lilies
The Weight of Water

also don’t forget this list! although some of these have expired since I compiled it.

oldfilmsflicker:

oldfilmsflicker:

Okay guys, I spent my entire Friday night combing through Netflix and compiling this handy dandy list (with links!) to 100 films directed by women that you can watch RIGHT NOW. Quite a few of these I haven’t even seen myself! There’s comedies and dramas and romances and horror and action and documentary and foreign and Oscar winners and Razzie winners (maybe?) and pretty much anything you could want to watch. I’m sure there are more films by women on the service (100 out of thousands is a good way of hitting the 12% of films stat right on home though). Anyways, enjoy!

  1. 14 Women
  2. 2 Days in Paris
  3. 2 Days in New York
  4. 28 Days
  5. A League of Their Own
  6. Adore
  7. Aeon Flux
  8. After the Wedding
  9. Ai Wei Wei: Never Sorry
  10. American Psycho
  11. And While We Were Here
  12. Bastards
  13. Bedrooms and Hallways
  14. Blackfish
  15. Blindsight
  16. Boys Don’t Cry
  17. The Boys Next Door
  18. The Brady Bunch Movie
  19. Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason
  20. Camilla
  21. Carolina
  22. Cherry Blossoms
  23. Children of a Lesser God
  24. Clueless
  25. Committed
  26. Control Room
  27. Countdown to Zero
  28. The Countess
  29. Der Wald Vor Lauter Baumen (Forest For the Trees)
  30. Desert Hearts
  31. Die Friseuse (The Hairdresser)
  32. Dragstrip Girl
  33. Elegy
  34. Fish Tank
  35. For Ellen
  36. Friends With Kids
  37. Goodbye First Love
  38. The Guilt Trip
  39. Holy Smoke
  40. Home
  41. The Hot Flashes
  42. In Between Days
  43. In the Land of Blood and Honey
  44. The Iron Lady
  45. The Kids Are All Right
  46. La Teta Asustada (The Milk of Sorrow)
  47. Last Call at the Oasis
  48. Life Happens
  49. A Little Bit of Heaven
  50. Look Who’s Talking
  51. Look Who’s Talking Too
  52. Lore
  53. Lost in Translation
  54. Love Serenade
  55. Madeinusa
  56. The Man Who Cried
  57. Me and You and Everyone You Know
  58. Movern Callar
  59. The Moth Diaries
  60. My Brilliant Career
  61. Nowhere Boy
  62. Nuyorican Dream
  63. Old Joy
  64. The Peacemaker
  65. Peeples
  66. The Piano
  67. Ping Pong Playa
  68. Plush
  69. Priest
  70. The Prince of Tides
  71. Protagonist
  72. Puccini For Beginners
  73. The Punk Singer
  74. The Queen of Versailles
  75. Ravenous
  76. Riding in Cars with Boys
  77. The Selfish Giant
  78. Shades of Fear
  79. SherryBaby
  80. Sister
  81. Sleeping Beauty
  82. Something’s Gotta Give
  83. Somewhere
  84. The Square
  85. Strange Days
  86. The Taste of Others
  87. Things Behind the Sun
  88. Tiny Furniture
  89. Tomboy
  90. Touchy Feely
  91. Trois Mondes (Three Worlds)
  92. Una Noche
  93. Union Square
  94. Variety
  95. Vinter’s Luck (A Heavenly Vintage)
  96. The Virgin Suicides
  97. Walking and Talking
  98. Waste Land
  99. Water Lilies
  100. The Weight of Water

also don’t forget this list! although some of these have expired since I compiled it.

cinephiliabeyond
cinephiliabeyond:

Read, learn, and absorb: Stanley Kubrick and Jim Thompson’s screenplay for Paths of Glory [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

In 1956, a 26-year-old Stanley Kubrick asked Thompson to adapt Lionel White’s “Clean Break.” Retitled The Killing for the screen, it became Kubrick’s breakthrough movie. Thompson’s multi-narrative, tightly-wound script about a racetrack heist going wrong would resound down the years in Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs. Jim also collaborated on Kubrick’s next venture, the World War I drama Paths of Glory.

In 1956, when Kubrick and producing partner James B. Harris secured the film rights to Lionel White’s caper novel Clean Break, it was Kubrick’s idea to recruit Thompson as his co-writer. “Are you familiar with a guy named Jim Thompson,” he asked Harris. “He’s a terrific writer who’s written some stuff I love.” Living in Sunnyside, Queens at the time, soft-spoken Jim Thompson was soon working with the budding maverick director.

In 1957, when Harris-Kubrick moved to California, the Thompson family relocated to Hollywood Hills to be close to Stanley. Riding into the sun-drenched city on the train, they were met at the station by the director. “The writing of Paths of Glory was essentially a very well-paid part time job for Thompson,” reported biographer Michael McCauley in his 1991 book Sleep With the Devil. “With a burst of spirit and a bust of creativity, he wrote and sold two novels (The Kill-Off and Wild Town) that same year.”

In actuality, Kubrick hired Thompson to rewrite the original draft penned by Calder Willingham. However, when their star Kirk Douglass read Thompson’s rewrite, he was appalled and reportedly threw the script across the room. Demanding that the Willingham’s version be reinstated, the final shooting script was credited to the two writers and director Kubrick. According to biographer Robert Polito, only seven scenes of Thompson’s made the final cut.

Although Paths of Glory won the Directors Guild of America Award for best screenplay, with the exception of a few television shows and a failed attempt to adapt his novel The Getaway (star Steve McQueen didn’t like the script), Thompson’s screenwriting career stalled. —Cold Blood: On Jim Thompson and Stanley Kubrick
Script pages for Paths of Glory with Kubrick’s handwritten notes:


On the set of Paths of Glory, Kubrick watches the actors perform with his characteristic look of concentration:


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cinephiliabeyond:

Read, learn, and absorb: Stanley Kubrick and Jim Thompson’s screenplay for Paths of Glory [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

image

In 1956, a 26-year-old Stanley Kubrick asked Thompson to adapt Lionel White’s “Clean Break.” Retitled The Killing for the screen, it became Kubrick’s breakthrough movie. Thompson’s multi-narrative, tightly-wound script about a racetrack heist going wrong would resound down the years in Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs. Jim also collaborated on Kubrick’s next venture, the World War I drama Paths of Glory.

In 1956, when Kubrick and producing partner James B. Harris secured the film rights to Lionel White’s caper novel Clean Break, it was Kubrick’s idea to recruit Thompson as his co-writer. “Are you familiar with a guy named Jim Thompson,” he asked Harris. “He’s a terrific writer who’s written some stuff I love.” Living in Sunnyside, Queens at the time, soft-spoken Jim Thompson was soon working with the budding maverick director.

In 1957, when Harris-Kubrick moved to California, the Thompson family relocated to Hollywood Hills to be close to Stanley. Riding into the sun-drenched city on the train, they were met at the station by the director. “The writing of Paths of Glory was essentially a very well-paid part time job for Thompson,” reported biographer Michael McCauley in his 1991 book Sleep With the Devil. “With a burst of spirit and a bust of creativity, he wrote and sold two novels (The Kill-Off and Wild Town) that same year.”

In actuality, Kubrick hired Thompson to rewrite the original draft penned by Calder Willingham. However, when their star Kirk Douglass read Thompson’s rewrite, he was appalled and reportedly threw the script across the room. Demanding that the Willingham’s version be reinstated, the final shooting script was credited to the two writers and director Kubrick. According to biographer Robert Polito, only seven scenes of Thompson’s made the final cut.

Although Paths of Glory won the Directors Guild of America Award for best screenplay, with the exception of a few television shows and a failed attempt to adapt his novel The Getaway (star Steve McQueen didn’t like the script), Thompson’s screenwriting career stalled. —Cold Blood: On Jim Thompson and Stanley Kubrick

Script pages for Paths of Glory with Kubrick’s handwritten notes:

On the set of Paths of Glory, Kubrick watches the actors perform with his characteristic look of concentration:

feminist-phone-intervention

feminist-phone-intervention:

next time someone demands your digits and you want to get out of the situation, you can give them this number: (669) 221-6251.

when the person calls, an automatically-generated quotation from feminist writer bell hooks will respond for you.

protect your privacy while dropping some feminist…